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The Famine Ended 70 Years Ago, but Dutch Genes Still Bear Scars

The Famine Ended 70 Years Ago, but Dutch Genes Still Bear Scars

A victim of starvation during the Dutch famine of 1944-45. Women pregnant during the period gave birth to babies who were affected by health problems throughout their lives.

To See the Best Christmas Trees, You’ll Need Scuba Gear

To See the Best Christmas Trees, You’ll Need Scuba Gear

A Spirobranchus worm, commonly called the Christmas tree worm, on a coral reef near Eilat, Israel.

An Island, a Focal Point for a Healthy Marine Ecosystem

An Island, a Focal Point for a Healthy Marine Ecosystem

Waters surrounding a remote coral reef atoll teeming with marine life.

You Are Shaped by the Genes You Inherit. And Maybe by Those You Don’t.

You Are Shaped by the Genes You Inherit. And Maybe by Those You Don’t.

Graduation at City College in New York in 2016. A study in Iceland focusing on education suggests that parental genes may help determine how long children stay in school.

Trapped in 99-Million-Year-Old Amber, a Beetle With Pilfered Pollen

Trapped in 99-Million-Year-Old Amber, a Beetle With Pilfered Pollen

A mid-Cretaceous beetle had a cavity filled with hair at the base of its mandibles for collecting pollen from plants known as cycads.

To Beat Go Champion, Google’s Program Needed a Human Army

To Beat Go Champion, Google’s Program Needed a Human Army

Lee Se-dol, a professional Go player from South Korea, was smiling amid other players despite losing four of five games against a Google computer program called AlphaGo.

At 12, He Had a Viral Science Video. At 14, He Fears He Was Too Rude.

At 12, He Had a Viral Science Video. At 14, He Fears He Was Too Rude.

Marco Zozaya in March near his home in Mexico. He aspires to be a science communicator like Neil deGrasse Tyson, but faces the conundrum of internet audiences and algorithms that may prefer drama over scientific information.

The Rational Choices of Crack Addicts

The Rational Choices of Crack Addicts

Carl Hart, an associate professor at Columbia University, is the author of the book “High Price,” a mix of memoir and scientific research about drug addiction.

Farmland Birds in France Are in Steep Decline

Farmland Birds in France Are in Steep Decline

Over the past 17 years, the numbers of some bird species in French farming regions have dropped considerably. Meadow pipits have declined by 68 percent.

Yanny or Laurel? How a Sound Clip Divided America

Yanny or Laurel? How a Sound Clip Divided America

Sound waves are the new internet dresses.

Humans Are Spreading Deadly Bee Virus, Study Says

Humans Are Spreading Deadly Bee Virus, Study Says

A honeybee with pollen on its legs.

‘Global Greening’ Sounds Good. In the Long Run, It’s Terrible.

‘Global Greening’ Sounds Good. In the Long Run, It’s Terrible.

Plant growth is increasing because of rising carbon dioxide. But plants return carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at night, in a process called respiration.

What Makes Some Hair Curly? Not Quite What Scientists Thought

What Makes Some Hair Curly? Not Quite What Scientists Thought

Merino sheep on a farm in Alexandra, New Zealand. Scientists found that differences in the cells on a hair explain a sheep’s curls, and may offer insights for other mammals, like us.

Wild and Craggy, Just Like Thoreau

Wild and Craggy, Just Like Thoreau

The view from the summit of "Mount Thoreau" looking south toward the Palisades and the Northern boundary of Kings Canyon National Park.

As D.I.Y. Gene Editing Gains Popularity, ‘Someone Is Going to Get Hurt’

As D.I.Y. Gene Editing Gains Popularity, ‘Someone Is Going to Get Hurt’

Across the country, biohackers — hobbyists, amateur geneticists, students and enthusiasts — are practicing gene editing, concerning some bioterrorism experts.


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